Learn About Hostas

Learn About Hostas

Botanical Names: Hosta, astilbe, golden hakone grass (Hakonechloa macra ‘Aurea’), lungwort (Pulmonaria), Siberian bugloss (Brunner macrophylla)

Splash some color into your yard’s shady corners by planting hostas. These leafy plants are perennial favorites, and growing hostas isn’t reserved for experienced gardeners. Learning how to grow hostas isn’t difficult — it’s actually one of the easiest perennials to tend. Glean some tips on when to plant hostas, how to plant hostas and what to plant with hostas.

Not sure when to plant hostas? The good news is that timing isn’t too critical. Most gardeners tackle planting hostas in the spring or fall. In spring, you can plant bareroot or potted hosta plants. Be sure soak bareroot hostas in water for a few hours before planting. For fall planting, you’ll probably use potted hostas. You can often find potted hostas on discount at garden centers in early fall. The trick with fall-planted hostas is timing. Aim to be planting hostas several weeks before the soil freezes. This gives plants plenty of time to sink roots before harsh weather arrives.

It’s not challenging to learn how to plant hostas. Start by determining where to plant hostas. Most hostas like shady conditions, but newer sun tolerant hostas can withstand morning or, with some varieties, all day sun. Start planting hostas by digging a hole and adding organic matter. Compost, composted manure, ground tree bark or other locally available materials provide ideal sources of organic matter, which helps soil retain water so it’s readily available to plant roots.

Dig planting holes that are wider than deep. Hostas aren’t especially deep-rooted but do tend to extend roots out to the edges of leaves. Make your hole wide enough so that roots fit without being folded. Tuck the hosta into the hole so that it sits at the same depth it did in the pot. Backfill the hole, and cover the bare soil with mulch.

One common problem gardeners find when growing hostas is that small critters like voles can cause serious damage to plants over winter. When adding mulch to cover soil, don’t pile it against hosta plant stems because this can trigger fungus diseases to attack leaf stems. You also don’t want to add a thick layer of mulch, which gives voles a place to tunnel and hide. Instead, add a 1- to 2-inch-thick layer, keeping it pulled back from the crown of the plant.

As you choose what to plant with hostas, you might consider traditional partners, like lacy ferns, astilbe and golden hakone grass (Hakonechloa macra ‘Aurea’). These plants unfurl leaves that provide a feathery, lacy textural contrast to the broad leaves of hosta plants. Other perennials that pair well with hosta include variegated cultivars of plants like lungwort (Pulmonaria) and Siberian bugloss (Brunnera macrophylla).

How often you need to transplant hostas varies. As a rule, hostas tend to grow bigger the longer they stay in one spot, so if you’re wanting a substantially sized plant, avoid frequent transplanting. If a plant has outgrown its place, then you should consider transplanting.
Some hosta varieties perform like many clump-forming perennials, with older plants dying out in the center of the clump. In this situation, new growth occurs along clump edges. This new growth is often individual small plants ideal for transplanting.
Usually transplanting hostas is easy and relatively quick. Take time to prepare the soil in the new planting area. Mix in plenty of organic matter to create a soil base that’s rich and drains well. For organic matter, use compost, ground tree bark, composted manure or any other material that’s locally available to you.
When transplanting hostas, you want to get as much of the root ball as you can. This is especially important with larger plants. Start digging the plant by inserting your shovel into soil just outside the edge of the leaves. Roots typically extend this far. Insert the shovel all the way around the hosta, forming a circle. Pry the plant out of the ground. With really large plants, roots may extend up to 18 inches deep.

 

All data herein is for information purposes and gathered from an outside source.

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Perennial Flowers and Plants to Make Any Yard Beautiful

Perennial Flowers and Plants to Make Any Yard Beautiful

Before you get to planting, it is important to understand what perennials even are. These flowers live for more than two years. Most bloom each spring and summer, die in the autumn and winter, and return in the spring (though there are some exceptions). And of course, just because you want a lush-looking garden come summer does not mean perennials are the way to go: The classic daylily, for instance, only blooms for one day.

Perennials are an excellent idea for just about any beginning gardener to become familiar with (they are also great for some types of vertical gardens).

Evergold

This more compact yellow striped ornamental grass does not turn brown in the winter. It’s a great choice for year-round color or using as a spiky texture contrast for round flowers, and is also short enough to use in the front of a bed.

Zones 5-8; partial shade; blooms in May

Hosta

Hosta could be an ideal choice for a small garden or even a container garden, particularly if you choose a more compact or dwarf variety (consider hosta “Mouse Ears,” for instance). Alternatively, you can use these flowers for big, splashy summer displays that will come back year after year.

Zones 3-9; needs minimal sun; blooms summer to fall

Hellebores

These winter-blooming perennials thrive even in dry shade, and they are both deer and slug resistant. New varieties come in a rainbow of beautiful colors. Some even have double flowers that look more like roses than hellebores.

Zones 6-9; partial shade ideal; blooms between December and April

Lavender

Drought-resistant lavender will be the star of your bed! Hotter summers and less rain mean these are a great plant to consider for any garden. There is even a new variety of lavender called “Platinum Blonde” that features fun yellow stripes in the foliage.

Zones 5-9; full sun; blooms late spring to early summer

Aster

While most perennials will bloom during the summer months, these will add beauty to your yard throughout the fall. You can find them in a variety of hues to add just the right pop of color to your garden.

Zones 3-8; full sun; blooms mid-summer to fall

Purple Coneflowers (Echinacea purpurea)

Native to North America, these classic flowers will produce beautiful blooms starting in early June and lasting until the first frost in your area. You will love the variety of other colors they come in, in addition to their durability and longevity.

Zones 3-8; full sun/partial shade; blooms summer

Daylily (Hemerocallis)

Nicknamed the “sure bet” and “perfect perennial,” these colorful flowers are perfect for beginners because they can survive through almost anything and require little maintenance. While the buds will only bloom for one day, each stem typically grows several blooms that will flourish at different times.

Zones 2-9; full sun/partial shade; blooms early- to mid-summer

Delphinium

Grow these blue and purple blooms in your yard and you will see them soar to new heights every year. Once they have bloomed, cut them and bring inside to display in a vase, and you’ll see new petals in no time.

Zones 3-9; full sun; blooms early- to mid-summer

Hydrangea

These colorful perennial shrubs will grow back fuller and larger each year, so be sure to plant them in an area with plenty of space to flourish and grow.

Zones 5-9; partial shade/full shade; blooms mid-summer to fall

Peony

These stunning flowers are incredibly fragrant, full, and fluffy. They can last for decades in the right conditions. While pink tends to be the most popular, white, lavender, and coral hues are just as gorgeous.

Zones 3-8; full sun; blooms spring to early summer

Phlox

If a statement is what you are after, opt for these summer flowers, which come in bold shades of pink, purple, red, and crisp white.

Zones 4-8; full sun; blooms early summer to fall

Sedum

These autumnal beauties are easy to grow, don’t require much maintenance, and are drought resistant making them a durable and long-lasting addition to your landscape.

Zones 3-9; full sun; blooms mid-summer to early fall

Shasta Daisy (Leucanthemum × superbum)

These cute flowers bloom in early spring, but if you cut them back in time, you can expect more blooms to crop up in early autumn. (The marguerite daisy—or “Paris daisy”—is another option.)

Zones 3-8; full sun/partial shade; blooms summer

Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)

If you need to fill up a space fast, yarrow will help your garden or yard feel full rather quickly. And since they come in so many different colors—pink, red, yellow, white, purple, peach, and orange—you can choose the best shades to complement your home’s palette.

Zones 3-8; full sun; blooms summer

Lungwort (Pulmonaria officinalis)

Also known as White Wings, this plant’s silver-spotted leaves create a distinct foundation for bell-shaped white flowers that reach heights of up to a foot.

Zones 3-9; partial shade; blooms early- to mid-spring

Speedwell (Veronica umbrosa)

Just six or so inches tall, this diminutive variety also known as Georgia Blue boasts loose clusters of electric blue blooms that last until summer.

Zones 4-9; full sun; blooms early- to mid-spring

Pinks (Dianthus gratianopolitanus)

The itty-bitty pink blossoms on this low-growing plant emit a delightful clove scent.

Zones 3-9; full sun; blooms late spring to early summer

Cranesbill (Geranium sanguineum)

This 12- to 18-inch-tall geranium also known as Alpenglow produces magenta flowers and velvety foliage that turns crimson in fall.

Zones 4-8; partial shade; blooms late spring to early summer

 

 

 

All content is for informational purposes only.

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Aztech Transparent logo

885 Piper Way

Sandwich, IL 60548

815.786.7647 Office

815.786.6654 Fax

Office Hours:

M-F 8 am - 4 pm

Sat 8 am - 1 pm

 

 

icpi logo

unilock logo

 

© 2021 Aztech Landscaping of Sandwich, IL provides landscaping services and decorative stone patios.
Popular service areas include: Lake Holiday, Oswego, Sandwich, Sugar Grove, and Yorkville. (see more areas)

website design by Willow Marketing Solutions

 

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